CHROMEO (Montreal, QC/New York, NY)

CHROMEO (Montreal, QC/New York, NY)

Main Stage, 10:45-12 midnight World leaders, powerful CEOs, and assorted other fat cats could learn myriad lessons from Chromeo, but the number one tip that Dave 1 and P-Thugg have is this: Know thyself, know thy vibe, and stay thy course. The rest of the population will catch up. What this means is that Chromeo is really good at being Chromeo. The mission, the package, the vision — it’s been a straight shot of pure intentionality from the jump. These Chromeo dudes? They have the whole being-these-Chromeo-dudes thing totally...
MATTHEW GOOD (Coquitlam, BC)

MATTHEW GOOD (Coquitlam, BC)

Main Stage, 8:40-9:40 p.m. He’s almost as well known for his outspoken geopolitical views and his curmudgeonly tendencies as he is for his music, but this only serves to endear him to his vast army of fans. Twenty years and eleven albums into his musical career, Matthew Good remains a brusquely forthright social critic and one of Canada’s most prolific musicians. Good began his musical career as a folk singer, when his band the Rodchester Kings was discovered at an open-mic night at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. After winning recording time in a band competition held by a Vancouver radio station, Good and what was the first incarnation of an ever-evolving Matthew Good Band recorded a demo tape that caught the ear of EMI, with whom they signed. After a cross-country tour in early 1995, the band split up. The Matthew Good Band was rapidly reformed with new members, who quickly began recording material that Good had written over the years. Led by Matthew Good’s reputation for subversive lyrics and the band’s driving rock sound, the Matthew Good Band became one of Canada’s most successful alt rock groups of the 1990’s. Their debut album, Last of the Ghetto Astronauts, was released in 1995 and created a groundswell of popularity for the band, initially in the Vancouver area, but spreading nationally with heavy play on both radio and MuchMusic. Financially it became the highest selling independent label release by a Canadian artist, and culturally it contained in the lyrics to the bonus track “Omissions of the Omen” what is believed to be the earliest known reference to the term “first world...
THE RURAL ALBERTA ADVANTAGE (Toronto, ON)

THE RURAL ALBERTA ADVANTAGE (Toronto, ON)

Main Stage, 6:45-7:30 p.m. The Rural Alberta Advantage play indie-rock songs about hometowns and heartbreak, born out of images from growing up in Central and Northern Alberta. They sing about summers in the Rockies and winters on the farm, ice breakups in the spring time and the oil boom’s charm, the mine workers on compressed, the equally depressed, the city’s slow growth and the country’s wild rose, but mostly the songs just try to embrace the advantage of growing up in...
RADIO RADIO (Clare, NS)

RADIO RADIO (Clare, NS)

The Koop Tent Stage, 9:50-10:35 p.m. Since their first releases Télé Télé EP (2007) and Cliché Hot (2008), Gabriel Louis Bernard Malenfant (NB) and Jacques Alphonse Doucet (NS) have impressed journalists and the public alike with their catchy hip-hop/electro-flavored hooks. With their second album Belmundo Regal, short-listed for the 2010 Polaris Music Prize, the Acadian duo won many awards, such as an Independent Music Award for Rap/Hip Hop Album (2011), a Miroir for Best Hip-Hop/Urban Performance at the Festival d’été de Québec, and a Révélation Musique 2010-2011 Radio-Canada title, as well as a Félix for Hip-Hop Album of the Year for their third full-length, Havre de Grâce (2012). After conquering the city (Cliché Hot), the sea (Belmundo Regal) and the stars (Havre de Grâce), and thus closing the first chapter of their story, the band wanted their next album to capture the energy of their live shows. The result is Ej feel zoo, released on March 2014. Having grown up in an environment where Anglophones rub shoulders with Francophones on a daily basis, the Acadian duo then offered their first album entirely in English, titled Light the Sky, in February 2016. The music on this latest album was produced by Shash’U, DJ Champion, J.u.D. and Alex McMahon. Over the past few years, Radio Radio has become a must-see act, having performed at, amongst others, the FrancoFolies de Montréal, the Festival d’été de Québec, the Festival International de Louisiane, SXSW, and the CMJ Music Marathon, as well as numerous festivals in France and...
KARDINAL OFFISHALL (Toronto, ON)

KARDINAL OFFISHALL (Toronto, ON)

Main Stage, 4:55-5:40 p.m. “I’m looking forward to the day when MCs are rapping again,” Kardinal Offishall opines. “Right about now, it seems like people are really not paying attention to lyrics, which doesn’t make any sense to me in this hip-hop thing.” Kardinal Offishall is conscious of the state of the game, and his particular place in it. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Kardinal grew up in the West Indian waypoint of Toronto. His hometown, which he credits for reflecting “the cultural mosaic philosophy instead of the melting pot,” seeps into his music: broad-reaching, deep-running. Having outgrown the trappings of Canadian hip-hop, Kardinal is maturing into a more prominent role: North America’s next musical superstar. Ironically, it’s questions about identity that have peppered Offishall’s career. Namely, surrounding the flavor of his tantalizing sonic brew: equal measures easy island riddim, cement-hardened cadence, teeth-rattling bassline, and vexing sing-song vocal. But how to describe this enticing blend to neophytes? Rap? Reggae? Dancehall? An intriguing hybrid? Labels don’t apply to Kardinal Offishall. Superlatives, however, fill in all the blanks: dope; unprecedented; the freshest thing you’ll hear this year. “My foundation is an MC, that’s what I consider myself,” Kardinal clarifies. “But at the same time, I can flip it up. I’m not the world’s greatest singer, but I can sing my ass off if I need to. I’m a lyricist, I’m a performer; I hate to sound corny, but I consider myself an entertainer.” “I don’t feel that I’m ever the same way 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” he expounds. “I go through a lot of different moods and I...